Eagles at Barber Park, Boise


24Dec2015_1a_Barber-Park_Eagles_SnowRather cold this morning at 9:00 – 29 degrees. But the Eagles were flying. The fish were active and other predators were around. Namely hawks. It was snowing lightly, but the activity along the Boise River was good. There was a report that there were several Eagles and yearlings further downstream from where I was. Robin was waiting in the car, hungry and cold. Best not follow up on that observation. I saw 2 adults and two yearlings, but only got to photograph the adults. Here’s what I saw. Keep Looking up! Left-Click any of these photos to see them enlarged.

Can anyone ID this hawk? Thanks.

Can anyone ID this hawk? Thanks.

Or ID this one?

Or ID this one?

The Boise River looking east from Barber Park.

The Boise River looking east from Barber Park.

Beautiful Eagle!

Beautiful Eagle!

Same one, different pose.

Same one, different pose.

Eagle flying west - downstream.

Eagle flying west – downstream.

Evidently he caught breakfast.

Evidently he caught breakfast.

The Boise River has many fish.

The Boise River has many fish.

24Dec2015_1h_Barber-Park_Eagles_Eating

Good pose!

Good pose!

Coopers Hawk


Shawn-Carmen_Falcon_Graphic-TitledLast night at about 7:20pm, our neighbor Becca called and said that she was out in her backyard, went inside for something and returned to her back yard. She said that “…this bird” was where she was working and that it had not been there before. She brought it to me.
I believe it is a Coopers Hawk. We have had one, or several, in the neighborhood for several years now. I hope this is not one of them. There are no visible trauma marks on the hawk and no signs of anything broken. Here are some post-mortem photos of the hawk. Left-Click to see a larger view. If someone from the Idaho Fish and Game, The Peregrine Fund or The Idaho Bird Observatory would like to have it or examine it, I will keep it for a short time. Please contact me.

Frontside view.

Frontside view. Coopers Hawk a neighbor found in her yard. No apparent wounds. Our neighbor called me last night and said she was in her backyard. Went inside. Came back out and saw this bird on the ground. It was not there before. Looks to me like a Coopers Hawk. No intrusive markings or wounds on the body. Neck is broken as if it hit something. No broken windows, “dusted” glass or prey pieces.

Back view.

Back view.

June 18 – Boise Falcons


Shawn-Carmen_Falcon_Graphic-TitledCan’t say that it has been exciting watching the falcons from the camera in the box. Generally, they are not there but rather probably on the ledge somewhere and out of camera sight. As of 1635 this afternoon, I have heard of no “incidents” with the falcons. Although, Robin and I did see people on the roof of the Cap One Center and the adults were not happy! The chicks were probably below the “intruders” on the ledge. The people knew that the Peregrines were there – I think they were dived on. Here is what Robin and I saw. Enjoy and Keep Looking Up!

Took this with my IPhone zoomed in. You can just about see the falcon. That is a long way up!

Took this with my IPhone zoomed in. You can just about see the falcon. That is a long way up!

Took this with my IPhone zoomed in, too. You can just about see the falcon. That is a long way up!

Took this with my IPhone zoomed in, too. You can just about see the falcon. That is a long way up!

Better view with my 500mm lens on my Nikon.

Better view with my 500mm lens on my Nikon.

Guarding the chicks from under the Zion sign.

Guarding the chicks from under the Zion sign.

Same photo as above, but zoomed in a little more.

Same photo as above, but zoomed in a little more.

Flying over me and checking my threat level out.

Flying over me and checking my threat level out.

Still looking at me.

Still looking at me.

Hope the folks on the roof are under cover. 'Cause here I come!

Hope the folks on the roof are under cover. ‘Cause here I come!

Like Zorro! Out of the sun so you can't see me. Very protective parents.

Like Zorro! Out of the sun so you can’t see me. Very protective parents.

Boise Falcons – June 4, 2015


PeregrineWebCam_Logo_BoiseOh my, how these “guys” have grown! Actually, 3 females and 1 male. If I were to guess, I would say that the last one to hatch is the male. It just looks smaller, even at this stage in their development. The Peregrine Fund put a great post on the falconcam site about their development and activities at this age. Interesting.

“June 2
You may be noticing that the chicks are becoming much more active now that they’re a bit older and are actually jumping out onto the ledge on occassion. They do eventually jump back into the nest, but this is a normal part of development for nestlings. Soon, they will enter a stage of life where they’re referred to as “branchers.” During this stage, chicks will spend more time out of the nest and flapping their wings. This helps to build muscle so that their breast muscles are ready to support their wings in the air when they take their first flights.”

Enjoy these screen shots from this morning! Keep Looking Up!

They have really grown and notice, too, their feathers are also changing.

They have really grown and notice, too, their feathers are also changing. 0901

The falcons are very alert.

The falcons are very alert. 0904

Great pose!

Great pose! 0908

"The Actress"

The Actress” 0911

Look at the size of her feet! 0913

Look at the size of her feet! 0913

Boise Falcon Chicks Have New Bracelets


PFund-GraphicI received word this week from the Peregrine Fund that the Boise falcon chicks were checked medically – they passed with flying colors – and they were banded. There was no word on the probable sex of each bird. Here is the complete text of the notification from the Peregrine Fund. Keep Looking Up and Left-Click any of these screen shots to see them enlarged.

“The Peregrine Fund chicks are sporting new jewelry today after having been banded by biologists from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game this morning. In addition to banding the chicks, wing and leg measurements were taken, and health was observed. All four falcon chicks appeared to be healthy and thriving, and the data collected will help researchers to continue monitoring the condition of the Peregrine Falcon population within our region.”

The Boise Chicks

The Boise Chicks. 27 May 2015, 1400

“Did you know that the earliest recorded use of “bird bands” was made around 218-201 B.C. when a thread was tied to a crow’s leg to send messages between Roman officers during the Punic Wars? Since that time, the technology of banding birds has improved greatly. Bands are now often made of aluminum or another lightweight material imprinted with a series of unique numbers to help identify the bird, and people who band birds are required to obtain a special banding permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In fact, scientists rely on banding for data collection so much that in 1909 the American Bird Banding Association was formed to organize and assist the growing number of bird banders throughout North America.”

Wing stretches!

Wing stretches! 27 May 2015, 1515

“So the next time you are watching the FalconCam, make sure to keep an eye out for the chick’s shiny new bands!”

Feeding time.

Feeding time. 27 May 2015, 1522

Still hungry!

Still hungry! 27 May 2015, 1524

Mom has her hands full with these chicks! 27 May 2015, 1529

Mom has her hands full with these chicks! 27 May 2015, 1529

Nest Cam of the Month


17May2015_1d_Boise-Falcons_Mom-Feeds-1457It is great to see that the Peregrine Fund’s Falconcam has been selected as a Nest Cam of the Month: Peregrine Falcons by the Nature Conservancy. The link will take you to the article and explain a little about the Peregrine program and the history of the falcons. Interesting information. Be sure to read the comments, too. Keep Looking Up!

Boise Peregrine Falcons – 19 May 2015


PFund-GraphicLate last week, one of the followers on this blog and on FaceBook, was concerned that one of the chicks was not getting enough food or fed. I said that I would look into this. What I found was that all four chicks seem to be doing very well, and the small chick – the one that the reader was concerned about – was being fed and ate a large lunch. Here are some screen shots from the Peregrine Fund Falconcam showing the chicks on 17 May. Enjoy and Keep Looking Up! Left-Click any of these photos to see them enlarged.

The female is feeding the chicks.

The female is feeding the chicks. The chick that the reader was concerned about is the small one right in front.

17May2015_1a_Boise-Falcons_Mom-Feeds-1452

The Little One being fed.

The “Little One” being fed.

Still being fed.

The “Little One” still being fed. So why is this one so small? Probably because he/she was the last to hatch. They will all grow up to be “Big Birds” at about the same size. Then again, this one could be a male and the others female. We will just have to wait and see. Fun, isn’t it?

Se? The "Little One" did get a full lunch. Plenty to eat. The adults will not let them starve.

See? The “Little One” did get a full lunch. Plenty to eat. The adults will not let them starve.

And as the sun slowly settles in the West, the Boise Peregrine Chicks huddle down, close their  eyes and go to sleep.

And as the sun slowly settles in the West, the Boise Peregrine Chicks huddle down, close their eyes and go to sleep.

And this morning, 19 May 2015 at 0950, the chicks are sleeping quietly. Raining outside, but comparatively warm. And don't worrfy, at least one adult is very, very close. The chicks are not unguarded.

And this morning, 19 May 2015 at 0950, the chicks are sleeping quietly. Raining outside, but comparatively warm. And don’t worry, at least one adult is very, very close. The chicks are not unguarded.