Now There Are Three Eggs in Boise!


[Photo Credit and Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]

[Photo Credit and Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]

Yesterday, Sunday, we had 2 eggs in the Boise falcon nest. This morning there are 3! In general, the clutch size is 4 eggs, although that does vary. So we may get one more egg. So whenever you are in downtown Boise, you might want to look up at the top floor – 14th floor – of the Capitol One Center at 10th and Main. Or you can keep watching on the Falcon Cam. There is a link in the sidebar on this page. And please remember, all of these photos that I have posted here of the interior of the nest box are Photo Credit and Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers. Again, I thank them for allowing me to post these photos here. I know our readers appreciate the information. And directly from the Peregrine Fund page, I thought you might enjoy some information about the process you are watching. Enjoy! Left-Click the photo to see enlarged. Keep Looking Up!
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An adult Peregrine Falcon watches over a clutch of 3 eggs.
[Photo Credit and Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]

Pairs: Peregrine Falcons generally keep the same mate from year to year, but if one dies, the surviving bird will seek another.
Eggs: A typical clutch is three to four eggs, which are incubated for 32 to 35 days. The parents will use their beaks to roll and shift the eggs periodically during incubation. The male assists by sitting on the eggs while the female leaves to eat. The eggs will not hatch if they are infertile or the young dies during incubation.
Chicks: Called an eyas, a chick stays warm under its parent during the brooding period. Chicks are fed by both parents, who make sure each chick receives enough to eat. They are in the nest for six to seven weeks.
Fledging: Chicks prepare to leave the nest by flapping their wings in the nest, then taking short test flights. For about six weeks, they continue to be fed by their parents while honing their flying and hunting skills before striking out on their own.” [Peregrine Web Cam and information]
One adult protects the clutch of 3 eggs.

One adult protects the clutch of 3 eggs.

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