News From The Peregrine Fund


This news just in from the Peregrine Fund about the unhatched egg. We will probably end up with three chicks.

(Photo Credit and Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers) Feeding the chicks May 8, 2014

(Photo Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers) Feeding the chicks May 8, 2014

May 9

From Monday to Wednesday, three chicks successfully emerged from their eggs. The fourth egg is not expected to hatch. The adults will eventually roll the egg out of the scrape and off to the side of the nest box. The chicks are not yet capable of regulating their own body temperatures, so they will need their parents to keep them warm for about 10 days.

The yolk inside the egg, which nourished the embryos during incubation, was absorbed into the body cavity of the chicks immediately prior to hatching. Although the yolk keeps the chicks well-nourished for a few days, their begging instinct kicks in right away. The adults feed the chicks bits of food by tearing off small chunks of meat and delicately placing them in the chicks’ beaks.

From our experience of successfully raising thousands of falcons in captivity in the last 40 years, we know that a begging chick is not necessarily a hungry chick. The adults know how much food each chick requires. As effective as The Peregrine Fund is at feeding chicks, we can’t do it as well as the natural parents. [Peregrine Fund Webcam]

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