Boise Triplets Doing Fine


It has been beautiful here in Boise the past week. High 70’s and 80’s. No rain. Clear skies. And the Boise Triplets are really doing quite well. Here are some screen shots of them this morning. Notice the “black spots” on at least one of the chicks. Feathers are forming! And we are not the only ones with “new falcons”. Salt Lake City had the first of their eggs hatch yesterday morning! 0744 – Oops! Just saw that there are now two falcon chicks in Salt Lake City!! The second one made it in time for lunch. See note below!

It is feeding time. 0715 this morning. Notice the un-hatched egg.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
It is feeding time. 0715 this morning. Notice the un-hatched egg.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers] After mealtime nap.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
After mealtime nap.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers] Wing stretching.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
Wing stretching.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers] Triplet bonding.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
Triplet bonding.

Here is some information from the Peregrine Fund about the chicks being “left alone”.

Although the chicks appear to be alone at times, at least one adult is close by, out of camera range but ready to spring into action at any threat. The adults have a lot of time and energy invested in their offspring and are not likely to abandon or neglect them.

What happens if one of the adults is hurt or dies? Could the other one raise these demanding youngsters alone?

When something happens during incubation, the eggs usually must be abandoned so the adult can survive. After hatching, it would be possible to raise the chicks solo, but it would not be easy. These chicks have the best chance to survive if both parents are present to provide food, protect them from predators, and help them become independent.

Eyasses waiting to be fed. 1117. I think this adult may have a band.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
Eyasses waiting to be fed. 1117. I think this adult may have a band.

Note: At 1117 this morning while I was watching the cam, one of the adults flew in to the nest and started to clean the area. I noticed what could be a band on the females right leg – maybe silver? Let’s see if anyone else spots this.

Lunch arrives via the tiercel at 1144.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
Lunch arrives via the tiercel at 1144.

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