Special Events

2 Peregrine Chicks in Boise Confirmed


PeregrineWebCam_Logo_BoiseThe Peregrine Fund in Boise, today confirmed that there are two chicks in the box. Here is their notice – “FalconCam Update 5/6/16

Happy Mother’s Day to you and all the moms in your life! Just in time for Mother’s Day weekend, we’re excited to announce that two of the Peregrine Falcon chicks have hatched! We’re keeping a close eye out to see when the others hatch, but Mom is doing a great job of sitting tight on them to keep them warm!

If you do catch sight of the chicks, you’ll notice that they currently look like little white fluff-balls, but they won’t stay like that for long. Within the next 5-6 weeks they’ll grow to be full-sized Peregrines! At that time they will have all of their feathers and be ready to fledge the nest.

This is when the FalconCam becomes really fun to watch! We also recommend turning on your sound and listening to the camera as the parents usually vocalize when switching places or bringing food back to the nest. Those vocalizations can be a good indication that you’ll be able to catch a glimpse of the chicks. As the chicks grow, you’ll notice new development and an increase in size almost every day.

Tune into the FalconCam at: Web Cam Link” [Peregrine Fund, May 6, 2016]

Mom stretches to get some "left-overs" while continuing to keep the chicks warm and the remaining two eggs incubated.

Mom stretches to get some “left-overs” while continuing to keep the chicks warm and the remaining two eggs incubated. [6 May 2016, Boise, Idaho]

And So The Season Begins!


PFund-GraphicYea! The Boise falcons have returned and the female is incubating eggs. Here is the latest from the Peregrine Fund. There is a new, 2016, hot link to the Boise FalconCam in the sidebar.

This just in from the Peregrine fund…

2016 FalconCam Update 4/11/16

Welcome to the 2016 FalconCam season! This is the eighth year a webcam has provided you with a front-row seat for watching the daily activities at a nest box in downtown Boise.

The female Peregrine Falcon is already incubating eggs, and we’re all eager to get a glimpse to see how many have already been laid. Peregrine Falcon eggs are typically incubated for an average of 34 days before hatching which means our first chicks should make an appearance at the beginning of May.

The Peregrine Fund was instrumental in the recovery of Peregrine Falcons in the United States and our work led to them being removed from the U.S. Endangered Species List in 1999. It is particularly neat to get to watch a pair doing so well right in downtown Boise!

We would like to thank our FalconCam partners Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers for their support in monitoring the birds and for providing live streaming video. We hope you enjoy watching the Boise Falcon Family grow!

First screen shot of the Boise downtown falcons. Looks like the camera lens needs cleaning.

First screen shot of the Boise downtown falcons. Looks like the camera lens needs cleaning.

Coopers Hawk


Shawn-Carmen_Falcon_Graphic-TitledLast night at about 7:20pm, our neighbor Becca called and said that she was out in her backyard, went inside for something and returned to her back yard. She said that “…this bird” was where she was working and that it had not been there before. She brought it to me.
I believe it is a Coopers Hawk. We have had one, or several, in the neighborhood for several years now. I hope this is not one of them. There are no visible trauma marks on the hawk and no signs of anything broken. Here are some post-mortem photos of the hawk. Left-Click to see a larger view. If someone from the Idaho Fish and Game, The Peregrine Fund or The Idaho Bird Observatory would like to have it or examine it, I will keep it for a short time. Please contact me.

Frontside view.

Frontside view. Coopers Hawk a neighbor found in her yard. No apparent wounds. Our neighbor called me last night and said she was in her backyard. Went inside. Came back out and saw this bird on the ground. It was not there before. Looks to me like a Coopers Hawk. No intrusive markings or wounds on the body. Neck is broken as if it hit something. No broken windows, “dusted” glass or prey pieces.

Back view.

Back view.

07 May 2015 – 3 Chicks and 1 Egg


PFund-GraphicWhile watching the falconcam this morning, the tiercel brought in some food when the female was brooding. She left the chicks for an instant. There were 3 chicks and 1 egg clearly visible. That fourth egg should hatch soon. Here are some screen captures from the feeding this morning. Enjoy and Keep Looking Up! There is a link to the Boise Falconcam in the sidebar. Watch the falcons via live feed. And as a Note: It is very noisy around the nest this morning. Voices; scaffold/equipment moving?; and not from street level. Close enough to hear voices. Mom is on constant alert.

Mom gets some food from Dad and brings it back to the chicks. 0927

Mom gets some food from Dad and brings it back to the chicks. 0927

She begins to "clean" and prep  the food for the chicks. Feathers fly! 0936

She begins to “clean” and prep the food for the chicks. Feathers fly! 0936

Starting the feeding process. 0938

Starting the feeding process. 0938

The chicks are being fed. 0941

The chicks are being fed. 0941

09 April 2015 – Boise Peregrines


PFund-GraphicIt is always interesting to watch the incubating sequence. The adults seem to know exactly when to turn the eggs; when to cool them down and when to warm them more. At some point in time, they will start to “talk” to the eggs, probably the start of the hatching process, which may take several hours.
In these screen captures, which are used by permission, we see a sequence of “cooling” the eggs down, and then eventually, returning the one egg to the brood patch to keep it warm. Enjoy the photos in the sequence and Keep Looking Up!

At 1201 today, I noticed that one of the four eggs was laying outside of the warmth of the brood patch. The egg is visible here.

At 1201 today, I noticed that one of the four eggs was laying outside of the warmth of the brood patch. The egg is visible here.

At 1206 the one egg was still visible, approximately 5 minutes at 54 degrees F.

At 1206 the one egg was still visible, approximately 5 minutes at 54 degrees F.

At 1208, the tiercel places the exposed egg back into the brood patch. Interesting. He also re-arranged the scrape.

At 1208, the tiercel places the exposed egg back into the brood patch. Interesting. He also re-arranged the scrape.

Boise Peregrine Falcon Cam Is Up and Running!


Shawn-Carmen_Falcon_Graphic-TitledI just received this information from the Peregrine Fund.

“Welcome to the 2015 FalconCam Season! We are thrilled to provide you with a front-row seat for watching downtown Boise’s Peregrine Falcon family once again.

This year the big news is that the female Peregrine has laid four beautiful eggs and so the exciting watch to see when they will hatch is on! The camera is also equipped with audio so you can hear the interactions between male and female and listen to the chicks as they anticipate food delivery.

We are looking forward to another great season with these impressive birds and welcome your input as you record live events viewed while watching the FalconCam. Data collected by Falcon watchers will be used to better understand the nesting habits of this Peregrine pair.”

I have placed a more permanent link to the cam in the sidebar. But here it is also: Peregrine Webcam. Enjoy the cam and a big Thank-You to the Peregrine Fund and to Fiberpipe for providing this service to the world! Here is a “teaser” capture, used by permission.

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

Both parents and 4 eggs! (Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

1154, 07 April 2015 – Both parents and 4 eggs!
(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

09 March 2015 – Boise Falcons


Shawn-Carmen_Falcon_Graphic-TitledA beautiful morning this morning; full sun, cloudless skies and cool. Temperature about 48 at 10:15am on the Eastman Garage. The falcons seem to be on a schedule. For the past three or four times, they arrive at the box at about 10:20am MDT. People have also been asking what camera I use for these photos. I use a Nikon D5000, with a polarizer on a Sigma 150-500mm zoom.
Usually, but not always, I am on the 5th floor of the Eastman Parking Garage. I was lucky enough this morning to capture the tercel (I think) coming in to the box. The female was already there and came in about a minute earlier. Enjoy these photos and remember, to see them enlarged, Left-Click and of the photos. Keep Looking Up!.

The "Empty Nest" at 1020 this morning. Notice  the "leftovers" on the ledge and on top of the box.

The “Empty Nest” at 1020 this morning. Notice the “leftovers” on the ledge and on top of the box.

The female in the box.

The female in the box.

The Falcon (female) was already at the box. Here comes the tercel (male)!

The Falcon (female) was already at the box. Here comes the tiercel (male)!

The female in the box.

The female is in the box as the tiercel approaches.

Great reflection.

Great reflection.

Closer to a landing.

Closer to a landing.

"Honey! I'm home!"

“Honey! I’m home!”