Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund Fiberpipe Data Centers and Idaho Fish and Game Department

April 19, 2016 Update


Mostly the parents are being “good parents” and keeping the eggs protected and warm. There are at least 4 eggs in the nest and no reports of 5 eggs. The weather in Boise is warming up this week, mid to high 70’s and close to 80, but then a cool down next week to the low to mid 60’s. It’s Springtime in the Rockies! This screen capture was taken this morning at 0900. Keep Looking Up!

Teirsil just stopped incubating and is out for a flight. 62 degrees F already and clear skies. Look close and count the eggs.

Tiercel just stopped incubating and is out for a flight. 62 degrees F already and clear skies. Look close and count the eggs.

And So The Season Begins!


PFund-GraphicYea! The Boise falcons have returned and the female is incubating eggs. Here is the latest from the Peregrine Fund. There is a new, 2016, hot link to the Boise FalconCam in the sidebar.

This just in from the Peregrine fund…

2016 FalconCam Update 4/11/16

Welcome to the 2016 FalconCam season! This is the eighth year a webcam has provided you with a front-row seat for watching the daily activities at a nest box in downtown Boise.

The female Peregrine Falcon is already incubating eggs, and we’re all eager to get a glimpse to see how many have already been laid. Peregrine Falcon eggs are typically incubated for an average of 34 days before hatching which means our first chicks should make an appearance at the beginning of May.

The Peregrine Fund was instrumental in the recovery of Peregrine Falcons in the United States and our work led to them being removed from the U.S. Endangered Species List in 1999. It is particularly neat to get to watch a pair doing so well right in downtown Boise!

We would like to thank our FalconCam partners Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers for their support in monitoring the birds and for providing live streaming video. We hope you enjoy watching the Boise Falcon Family grow!

First screen shot of the Boise downtown falcons. Looks like the camera lens needs cleaning.

First screen shot of the Boise downtown falcons. Looks like the camera lens needs cleaning.

07 May 2015 – 3 Chicks and 1 Egg


PFund-GraphicWhile watching the falconcam this morning, the tiercel brought in some food when the female was brooding. She left the chicks for an instant. There were 3 chicks and 1 egg clearly visible. That fourth egg should hatch soon. Here are some screen captures from the feeding this morning. Enjoy and Keep Looking Up! There is a link to the Boise Falconcam in the sidebar. Watch the falcons via live feed. And as a Note: It is very noisy around the nest this morning. Voices; scaffold/equipment moving?; and not from street level. Close enough to hear voices. Mom is on constant alert.

Mom gets some food from Dad and brings it back to the chicks. 0927

Mom gets some food from Dad and brings it back to the chicks. 0927

She begins to "clean" and prep  the food for the chicks. Feathers fly! 0936

She begins to “clean” and prep the food for the chicks. Feathers fly! 0936

Starting the feeding process. 0938

Starting the feeding process. 0938

The chicks are being fed. 0941

The chicks are being fed. 0941

09 April 2015 – Boise Peregrines


PFund-GraphicIt is always interesting to watch the incubating sequence. The adults seem to know exactly when to turn the eggs; when to cool them down and when to warm them more. At some point in time, they will start to “talk” to the eggs, probably the start of the hatching process, which may take several hours.
In these screen captures, which are used by permission, we see a sequence of “cooling” the eggs down, and then eventually, returning the one egg to the brood patch to keep it warm. Enjoy the photos in the sequence and Keep Looking Up!

At 1201 today, I noticed that one of the four eggs was laying outside of the warmth of the brood patch. The egg is visible here.

At 1201 today, I noticed that one of the four eggs was laying outside of the warmth of the brood patch. The egg is visible here.

At 1206 the one egg was still visible, approximately 5 minutes at 54 degrees F.

At 1206 the one egg was still visible, approximately 5 minutes at 54 degrees F.

At 1208, the tiercel places the exposed egg back into the brood patch. Interesting. He also re-arranged the scrape.

At 1208, the tiercel places the exposed egg back into the brood patch. Interesting. He also re-arranged the scrape.

Boise Fluff-Balls Are On The Move


(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

On the 23rd of May, these little “Fluff Balls” have moved from inside the nest box, as pictured here, to the ledge just outside the nest and out of camera view. They are truly Wandering. The do not have flight feathers yet, but they are starting to appear – the black colored ones. And yes, they will flap these little under developed wings. Lets just hope they do not go over the edge. Wonder if the Peregrine fund and/or the Fish and Game have people “on call” in case something happens. I have not heard. When and if I do hear something, I will let you know. In the meantime, enjoy these photos. Keep Looking Up!

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers) One of the eyasses on the ledge.

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)
One of the eyasses on the ledge. There may be another one or two on the east side of the nest and out of camera view.

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers) Two of the "Fluff Balls" on the ledge.

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)
Two of the “Fluff Balls” on the ledge. The second one “just appeared” and was eating.

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

Boise Peregrine Falcons – Growing Like Weeds!


Here they "fuzz balls" were this morning at 0927. It looks like they had just eaten. They are getting huge! (These falcons are growing like weeds. Taken this morning at 0927. (Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers))

Here the “fuzz balls” were this morning at 0927. It looks like they had just eaten. They are getting huge! Keep Looking Up!
(Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers)

Boise Triplets Doing Fine


It has been beautiful here in Boise the past week. High 70’s and 80’s. No rain. Clear skies. And the Boise Triplets are really doing quite well. Here are some screen shots of them this morning. Notice the “black spots” on at least one of the chicks. Feathers are forming! And we are not the only ones with “new falcons”. Salt Lake City had the first of their eggs hatch yesterday morning! 0744 – Oops! Just saw that there are now two falcon chicks in Salt Lake City!! The second one made it in time for lunch. See note below!

It is feeding time. 0715 this morning. Notice the un-hatched egg.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
It is feeding time. 0715 this morning. Notice the un-hatched egg.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers] After mealtime nap.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
After mealtime nap.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers] Wing stretching.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
Wing stretching.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers] Triplet bonding.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
Triplet bonding.

Here is some information from the Peregrine Fund about the chicks being “left alone”.

Although the chicks appear to be alone at times, at least one adult is close by, out of camera range but ready to spring into action at any threat. The adults have a lot of time and energy invested in their offspring and are not likely to abandon or neglect them.

What happens if one of the adults is hurt or dies? Could the other one raise these demanding youngsters alone?

When something happens during incubation, the eggs usually must be abandoned so the adult can survive. After hatching, it would be possible to raise the chicks solo, but it would not be easy. These chicks have the best chance to survive if both parents are present to provide food, protect them from predators, and help them become independent.

Eyasses waiting to be fed. 1117. I think this adult may have a band.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
Eyasses waiting to be fed. 1117. I think this adult may have a band.

Note: At 1117 this morning while I was watching the cam, one of the adults flew in to the nest and started to clean the area. I noticed what could be a band on the females right leg – maybe silver? Let’s see if anyone else spots this.

Lunch arrives via the tiercel at 1144.

[Used By Permission: The Peregrine Fund, Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Fiberpipe Data Centers]
Lunch arrives via the tiercel at 1144.